The training has started in earnest but how best to fuel for the endurance season?

Most people think of endurance as just doing an exercise over a long time/distance. This is true but it is the effect on the body and how it copes with these extremes that can make the difference.

In essence there are two types of endurance muscular and cardiorespiratory.

Muscular endurance is the work of either one muscle or a group of muscles and their ability to maintain a continued force of movement without fatigue.

Cardiorespiratory endurance is based around its ability to pump blood and oxygen to working muscles therefore reducing muscular fatigue whilst allowing for continued performance.

To perform well we need to feed the body large amounts of wholesome nutrients, not only to help with continued performance but also to ensure recovery and good health. Imagine putting diesel into your petrol tank and driving off, it won’t be long before the car splutters and chokes to a standstill (yep I have tried it), the human body is the same. Feed it a low nutrient diet full of processed foods, then push it to the extreme and it’s going to get sick, performance levels will drop, fatigue will set in and recovery will take longer.

We all know that a well-balanced diet consisting of carbohydrates, protein and healthy fat is essential to keep our bodies in shape and to fuel us through daily life. When it comes to athletic performance, we need to take it to the next level.

Endurance athletes, be they weekend warriors or full time athletes need a much higher calorific intake than the average person to cope with the extra energy demands placed upon the body , the main fuel source of which is going to be carbohydrates to ensure glycogen levels are kept at a premium both during training and when competing.

As stated carbs are the main energy sources during endurance events and should not be under estimated. That said, the body can only store a limited supply, therefore the amount of glycogen stored in both the liver and muscles will dictate when fatigue sets in, we all know the term “hitting the wall” when it feels like you just cannot move any further and the body just wants to shut down.

As a general rule carb intake for endurance athletes works out at 5–12 g/per kg bodyweight depending on the amount of time spent training/competing. So carb intake should be 50–65% of their calorie consumption.

It is also essential to consume good quality protein to enhance recovery and maintain muscle. Protein is an essential building block for the body. Intake levels will vary for each individual but as a guideline the recommendation is 1.2–1.4g/ per kg bodyweight although in some cases up to 2g can be of benefit. Again this should be based around the training regime and daily calorific intake of the individual.

This is only a brief look at endurance nutrition, there is so much more that can be said about the role of protein and fats, as for carbohydrates which one is best before, during and after training/event day? What are the different types and how do the affect the body? Way too much for one blog.

If you want to know more or get help training, find me at

www.PaulCollinsFitness.co.uk