Why do you do what you do?

What is your driving force, what makes you get out of bed each day?

What makes you turn up to the gym or your fitness session?

For some it is the usual new year let’s get it on and lose those extra pounds put on over the Christmas period. Others see it as a way to meet and socialise and perhaps are not really very interested in the benefits of exercise at all.

Then there are those that want to be a better person than they were before they walked into their session. If you want to get results then you got to get your ass in gear and sweat some; just turning up and going through the motions will give you nothing. Turn up with the right mind-set and the attitude of a winner and you are on the right path to achieving something good for yourself.

Remember though you have to better yourself each and every day. We can all be brilliant for one day but what about holding that thought and pushing it forward every day. Make each day better than yesterday; you can achieve anything you want so long as you are prepared to put in the hard graft.

  • Find a real sense of purpose,
  • Find the drive and enthusiasm to take you to the top of your game
  • Do not fear stepping outside your comfortable safe zone.

You see it so many times, people just going through the motions but achieving nothing.

You want to achieve? You want to win? Then set the target and work for it like your life depends on it.

That new body shape you desire won’t happen on its own – you have to earn it, sweat it out; you have to give up on some of life’s little pleasures. Now I am not saying you have to become a saint but you do need to live your life differently, eat natural wholesome foods, cut the crap from your life and yes your body may ache a little as you begin to tone and shape your torso.

It’s not just food and training that has to change, if you are going to train hard then you need to love your body some more; treat it with respect, stretch it out, roll it and rest it.

Sleep is just as important as training and clean eating, if not more so;

  • The average adult needs 7.5-9 hours’ sleep each night
  • The body goes through a detox process during the night; the brain begins to flush metabolic waste
  • Muscles begin to repair, etc.

For me I know that each day I must perform better than I did yesterday, no two days are the same, each day providing a new challenge, a new problem to get your head around.

Each time I step into my gym I know that session has to be taken to the next level, if it stays the same as yesterday then I have achieved nothing, my body just says oh that’s right we did this already and just goes with the flow. If I whack the weight a little higher or change up the tempo then I shock the body and it has to better itself it has to work it out and adapt to what I throw at it. I come out of that session feeling like I owned it. My goal is to own every session I do. Each session makes me stronger both physically and mentally giving me the edge on everyday life.

Take each task you do with the mind set of being your best and some and you will get the result you want. Just go through the motions then you may as well sit at home and sit that lazy ass on the sofa while you watch banal TV shows whilst feeding yourself the latest TV dinner packed with chemicals, sugar and salt!

  • Set targets, short term, medium, and the big one
  • Earn yourself a treat on the way (a smaller dress or pair of jeans)
  • Push yourself outside your comfort zone, stop playing safe
  • Work your ass off, get sweaty and feel the burn
  • Aim high
  • Believe in yourself
  • Always be better than you were yesterday, except nothing less.

At www.PaulCollinsFitness.co.uk we aim to make you a better version of you, helping you get fitter, stronger and happier.

Sometimes your best just isn’t enough

The training has started in earnest but how best to fuel for the endurance season?

Most people think of endurance as just doing an exercise over a long time/distance. This is true but it is the effect on the body and how it copes with these extremes that can make the difference.

In essence there are two types of endurance muscular and cardiorespiratory.

Muscular endurance is the work of either one muscle or a group of muscles and their ability to maintain a continued force of movement without fatigue.

Cardiorespiratory endurance is based around its ability to pump blood and oxygen to working muscles therefore reducing muscular fatigue whilst allowing for continued performance.

To perform well we need to feed the body large amounts of wholesome nutrients, not only to help with continued performance but also to ensure recovery and good health. Imagine putting diesel into your petrol tank and driving off, it won’t be long before the car splutters and chokes to a standstill (yep I have tried it), the human body is the same. Feed it a low nutrient diet full of processed foods, then push it to the extreme and it’s going to get sick, performance levels will drop, fatigue will set in and recovery will take longer.

We all know that a well-balanced diet consisting of carbohydrates, protein and healthy fat is essential to keep our bodies in shape and to fuel us through daily life. When it comes to athletic performance, we need to take it to the next level.

Endurance athletes, be they weekend warriors or full time athletes need a much higher calorific intake than the average person to cope with the extra energy demands placed upon the body , the main fuel source of which is going to be carbohydrates to ensure glycogen levels are kept at a premium both during training and when competing.

As stated carbs are the main energy sources during endurance events and should not be under estimated. That said, the body can only store a limited supply, therefore the amount of glycogen stored in both the liver and muscles will dictate when fatigue sets in, we all know the term “hitting the wall” when it feels like you just cannot move any further and the body just wants to shut down.

As a general rule carb intake for endurance athletes works out at 5–12 g/per kg bodyweight depending on the amount of time spent training/competing. So carb intake should be 50–65% of their calorie consumption.

It is also essential to consume good quality protein to enhance recovery and maintain muscle. Protein is an essential building block for the body. Intake levels will vary for each individual but as a guideline the recommendation is 1.2–1.4g/ per kg bodyweight although in some cases up to 2g can be of benefit. Again this should be based around the training regime and daily calorific intake of the individual.

This is only a brief look at endurance nutrition, there is so much more that can be said about the role of protein and fats, as for carbohydrates which one is best before, during and after training/event day? What are the different types and how do the affect the body? Way too much for one blog.

If you want to know more or get help training, find me at

www.PaulCollinsFitness.co.uk